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Water & Sanitation

Eight ideas to fund access to water and toilets for all by 2030

www.theguardian.com
Water & Sanitation

An estimated $1tn [£0.8tn] flows illegally out of developing countries and emerging economies each year - more than they receive in foreign direct investment and aid combined. Beyond bleeding the world's poorest economies, this propels crime, corruption and tax evasion.

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Health

What Ethiopia Taught Us about the Contraceptives Market

psiimpact.com
Health, Gender Equality

How do you get contraceptives into the hands of 6.2 million women and girls? Since committing to reach this goal in 2012 as part of the FP2020 initiative, Ethiopia has made significant progress, with 1.5 million additional contraceptive users as of 2015.

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General

Secret aid worker: the UK NGO sector is facing a funding crisis

www.theguardian.com
General

The UK aid sector is on the brink of a massive step backwards into the days of "projectitis", as a popular and crucial government funding stream begins to dry up. For 15 years, DfID’s Programme Partnership Arrangements have been a lifeline for NGOs, but the funding dries up in December. What then?

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Health

Climate change may be good for one thing - killing mosquitoes - Humanosphere

feedproxy.google.com
Health, Environment

Climate change is bad news for the planet, including the mosquitoes living in West Africa. Reduced rainfall will make it hard for mosquitoes to thrive and lead to lower rates of malaria in parts of the region, shows new research. It overturns earlier assumptions that malaria will get worse due to climate change.

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General

The phrase 'economic development' has bad associations in Latin America

www.theguardian.com
General

For many of those in Latin America, the phrase "economic development" is associated with - among other things - poverty, the exploitation of natural resources, environmental disasters, social discrimination, economic dependence and the criminalisation of protest. Latin America is the most unequal region in the world, with 10% of the population possessing 71% of the wealth.

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Environment

A cheap, simple experiment just found a very effective way to slow deforestation

www.washingtonpost.com
Environment

In a convincing new study conducted in Uganda and based on a program sponsored in part by its government, a team of researchers have found an effective and affordable way to combat deforestation in a country showing some of the fastest tree loss rates in the world. How? The program simply paid owners of forest land not to cut down their own trees for either agricultural purposes or to sell them for timber.

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Health

Children in poor nations slow in developing basic skills

www.scidev.net
Health

Large numbers of young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are failing to meet basic developmental standards that are linked with later-life health, productivity and wellbeing.

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Agriculture

World Bank Working Paper: Will digital technologies transform agriculture in developing countries?

www.e-agriculture.org
Agriculture

Mobile phones and the internet have significantly affected practically all sectors of the economy, and agriculture is no exception. Building on a recent World Bank flagship report, this paper introduces a concise framework for describing the main benefits from new information and communications technologies.

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Environment

The developing world is investing more in renewable energy than rich countries

www.independent.co.uk
Environment

Last year broke records for investment in renewable energy with countries like China, India and even Mauritania in the forefront.

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Gender Equality

On Twitter, a study says half of all sexist abuse comes from women

qz.com
Gender Equality

Half of all sexist tweets come from women, according to a new study. The research, carried out by British think-tank Demos, revealed the scale of misogynistic abuse on Twitter perpetuated by both men and women.

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Environment

With Brazil in political crisis, science and the environment are on the chopping block

www.sciencemag.org
Environment

In the midst of Brazil’s political turmoil, pro-development forces are moving ahead on a constitutional amendment that could speed approval for dams, highways, mines, and other megaprojects. The measure has alarmed scientists, environmentalists, and indigenous rights advocates, who fear it would gut the country’s environmental licensing process. It is just one of a series of actions that has the scientific community on edge after Dilma Rousseff was removed as president on 12 May. Rousseff faces an impeachment trial for illegally borrowing money from state banks to cover budget deficits.

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Gender Equality

Level to level, women earn almost as much as men in India: survey

www.livemint.com
Gender Equality

Reams have been written about the difference in pay between men and women, which has emerged as a hot-button issue when it comes to gender equality at work. According to various surveys, the pay gap is estimated to vary anywhere between 19% and 27%. But on a closer look, the difference is far less, finds a recent global report.

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Agriculture

Farm Radio International: Tuning Into the Needs of African Women Farmers | E-Agriculture

www.e-agriculture.org
Agriculture

Farm Radio International is a Canadian charity working with more than 500 radio partners in 38 African countries to fight poverty and food insecurity. The charity helps African radio broadcasters meet the needs of local small-scale farmers and their families in rural communities.

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Agriculture

Why we need better ways to cut greenhouse gases from agriculture

theconversation.com
Agriculture

Although 177 countries signed the Paris Agreement to reduce global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in April 2016, the reductions they have pledged so far are not enough. To stand a chance of limiting warming to 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels by the century’s end, we need to get more specific about the reductions that sectors need to make.

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Education

Education group launches free multiple stream online portal - The Economic Times

economictimes.indiatimes.com
Education

A Bhopal based education group AISECT has launched a free massive open online course (mooc) and learning platform for various streams. "The portal 'aisectmoocs.com' has been launched to support the 'Skill India' and 'Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan' movements. It offers the largest number of courses introduced on an Indian mooc platform till date," an AISECT spokesperson said while launching the portal on Friday.

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Gender Equality

Girls Can't Code Because, You Know, Boobs (And Other Myths)

www.huffingtonpost.com
Gender Equality

Why can’t girls code? Oh, you know: Boobs. Menstruation. Being beautiful. They all get in the way. “I’ve tried to get into coding but my cleavage is just so distracting,” quipped one young woman in this provocative YouTube video. “When I’m not menstruating, I’m ovulating, so there’s no time to code at all,” lamented another.

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Gender Equality

Why It Matters When Hollywood Actresses Talk About Pay Equality

www.huffingtonpost.com
Gender Equality

This week everyone was talking about “House of Cards” — not because Netflix just dropped a new season on us, but because a star of the series, Robin Wright, dropped her own personal bombshell at an event in New York.

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Water & Sanitation

Two states, a canal and a river

www.indiawaterportal.org
Water & Sanitation

For over a month in early 2016, Delhi and Haryana thrashed around, trying to deal with the mess created after Jat protestors demanding reservation for the community in Haryana, caused a 200 feet breach on the Munak Canal near Sonepat.

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Water & Sanitation

Sanitation is not just about building toilets

www.livemint.com
Water & Sanitation

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s call in 2014 to end open defecation in India by 2019 saw many companies allocating a part of their corporate social responsibility (CSR) funds to the cause. Two years on, it is unclear what activities were undertaken, how much money was spent and the states that benefited the most from the so-called Water and Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) programmes under CSR.

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Water & Sanitation

UK water experts develop device to help save lives in India | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

www.dnaindia.com
Water & Sanitation

Experts at the University of Birmingham today announced that they have developed a unique device that could save lives in countries like India by quickly and simply testing whether water supplies are safe to drink.

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Gender Equality

Google Proposes 13 New Emojis for Gender Equality

www.payscale.com
Gender Equality

Take a look at your emojis for a moment. Can you find one that looks like a woman with a career? You won't find a businesswoman, a scientist, a doctor, or even a female graduate wearing a mortarboard. In fact, the recognizably female emojis are retrograde in the extreme: there's a bride, and a princess, and a dancer – just about the only one that could be representing a profession.

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Water & Sanitation

What India's missing toilets are costing the nation

www.financialexpress.com
Water & Sanitation

The question of sanitation in India is a complex one as it affects a number of social indicators such as nutrition, especially among children, food security, disease reduction and poverty in complex, interconnected ways. The fact that India contributes 60% to the world’s open defection is a statistic that requires our attention as a society, urgently.

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Environment

Canada wildfire - what are the environmental impacts?

www.theguardian.com
Environment

The explosive wildfire in Canada’s tar sands region that forced 90,000 people to flee last week is still burning. By Tuesday, “the beast” had grown to 230,000 hectares, but had moved into largely unpopulated regions east and south of the town of Fort McMurray, Alberta.

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Agriculture

Agriculture cannot be sacrificed for clean water

www.seattletimes.com
Agriculture, Water & Sanitation

HIDDEN inside a recent dust-upover spending by the Environmental Protection Agency is a bigger question for a Washington state product worth more than $1 billion a year. The product is milk, and the question is: Can cow manure be kept out of the state’s waters?

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General

The missing development trillions: welcome to the debate

www.theguardian.com
General

We wanted to open our series looking into the missing development trillions with a lovely Guardian infographic. We thought that on the lefthand side we could have a little widget showing how much we needed in order to pay for the sustainable development goals (SDGs), however many trillion dollars that might be.

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Agriculture

Organic farming: The best choice for our environment and growing world?

www.edf.org
Agriculture

Organic, locally grown food: Better for your family and for our hungry world – right? Heading to the farmer’s market in the warm spring sunshine, it’s easy to feel like you’re doing everyone on Earth a small favor. But like with so many things in life, it depends.

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General

Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption?

www.theguardian.com
General

Next Thursday, Prime Minister David Cameron will host a landmark international anti-corruption summit in London. There are high hopes for the conference, but after the Panama Papers revelations and the fact that only four countries are rated as 'active enforcers' of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, there's a lot of work to do.

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Water & Sanitation

Open Defecation Responsible For Waterborne Diseases In Nigeria - NGO | Nigerian News from Leadership News

leadership.ng
Water & Sanitation

Water, Sanitation for All, a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO), has said that 0pen defecation remains the biggest challenge to reducing water borne diseases in Nigeria. The Coordinator of the NGO, Mr Yunusa Abdullahi, made the statement in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja on Tuesday.

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Education

Local policymakers hold the key to school desegregation, U.S. education chief John King says

www.chalkbeat.org
Education

John King wants the nation’s schools to be less segregated — but there’s a limit to what he can do about it. That was the new federal education secretary’s message on Monday in a presentation to journalists, where he said local policymakers are the ones with the real power to integrate schools.

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Environment

Protecting the environment is critical for a stronger America

thehill.com
Environment

It's budget time again, and the House Republicans have released a new plan: "A Balanced Budget for a Stronger America." There is little to disagree with in the opening line of the budget: "A strong America is built on opportunity and the passion and talents of a free people who are empowered to pursue that opportunity, determine their own future, and achieve success." Yet a closer look reveals that the budget would significantly erode many regulations, rules and mandates designed to protect our environment, while at the same time expanding energy development likely to a carry hefty environmental toll.

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Gender Equality

Young Gay And Bisexual Men Were 6 Times More Likely To Attempt Suicide!

www.nationaldailypress.com
Gender Equality

People within sexual minority groups are more likely to face poor mental health when compared to the straight majority. Yet, minorities of any type are often incorrectly believed to be more homogeneous than they actually are, and some men within the LGBTQ spectrum could have a greater vulnerability to mental illness than others.

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Education

It's time to stop putting kids in separate gifted education programs

qz.com
Education

Every winter, thousands of New Yorkers take a standardized test that will determine their future opportunities. Some of them have studied for months, even paid for expensive test prep classes. And after it’s all over, maybe they can go back to playing with blocks, practicing tying their shoelaces, and singing the ABCs.

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Gender Equality

We're Tracking How We Represent Women With This Gender Equality Tool

motherboard.vice.com
Gender Equality

Last week, to kick off our “Silicon Divide” theme on gender equality, we turned the spotlight onto our own representation of women in Motherboard stories, and found ourselves lacking. Swedish data scientist Max Berggren is doing the same for media outlets around the world with his Gender Equality Tracker, produced by company Prognosis. The tool counts gendered names and pronouns to track the proportion of women featured across different news sources.

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Health

World Malaria Day--32% doctors believe unhygienic living conditions lead to rise in number of malaria deaths

www.thehealthsite.com
Health

Malaria has been a problem in India for centuries. According to 2014 WHO report, there were 1.6 million confirmed cases of malaria in India and 400-1000 deaths annually. The matter of concern is that from 2013 to 2014 the number of deaths due to malaria has increased from 400 to 600. The biggest burden of malaria in India is borne by the most backward, poor and remote parts of the country, with >90-95% cases reported from rural areas and <5-10% from urban areas; however, the low malaria incidence in urban areas may be due to almost non-existing surveillance.

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Health

What can technology do for global health?

www.weforum.org
Health

This year, the focus of the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos was on the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and how the technology revolution is changing all aspects of our world. The effects are particularly profound in the healthcare field.

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Education

Want Your Kids to Get a Good Education? Support Their Teachers' Workplace Rights

www.thenation.com
Education

Sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education enshrined the promise of educational equality as a constitutional right, the question of “separate but equal” in public schools has resurfaced, in a lawsuit that attempts to pit teachers’ labor rights against children’s rights to fair educational access.

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Education

Report: War hinders Afghan children from getting education, medical care

www.stripes.com
Education, Health

Violence and insecurity have made it increasingly difficult for Afghans, especially children, to access education and health care, the United Nations said Monday in a report.

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General

Urban poverty is probably worse than we think

feedproxy.google.com
General

Surveyors have essentially used the same tools to count the number of poor people living in urban centers around the world for more than three decades. With potentially outmoded tools, it's likely that the numbers they report are off base, most likely too low, according to researchers from the Overseas Development Institute.

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Education

Social mobility: Education alone is not enough - wealthy parents will always make sure their children are ahead

www.telegraph.co.uk
Education

Politicians talk a lot about opportunity and social mobility. Who could argue with that? If we want a real meritocracy, we know we have a long way to go. Britain has some of the lowest social mobility in the developed world. Over half of our top doctors, FTSE-100 chief execs, senior journalists and 70 per cent of High Court judges went to private schools.

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General

Data with Soul: Strengthening the Evidence for Development

www.huffingtonpost.com
General

The American author Brené Brown once said, “Maybe stories are just data with a soul.” Nowhere is that truer than in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Commission for Population and Development, where countries will be discussing how to strengthen the demographic evidence base for sustainable development. The global ambition of the 2030 agenda is to end poverty, achieve equitable sustainable development and ensure that no one is left behind. How? It sets out a series of goals and targets that each country must fulfil within the next 15 years.

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Water & Sanitation

Keep It Flowing: A Funder That's Quietly Sticking With Water and Sanitation

www.insidephilanthropy.com
Water & Sanitation

Another World Water Day has come and gone. Generally at this time, we see a flurry of activity and funding for WASH initiatives around the world. But that’s not the case so much this year. To be honest, the WASH funding arena has been relatively quiet lately. Of course, there are a few funders making some noise here, one of them being the Ikea Foundation. Ikea celebrated World Water Day in a big way with the €12.4 million grant to support and expand Water.org’s WaterCredit program in India and Indonesia. When all is said and done, Water.org’s expansion efforts will provide safe water and sanitation to an estimated 1 million people.

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Water & Sanitation

How better water can lead to better jobs

www.globalcitizen.org
Water & Sanitation

World Water Day was created to bring attention to the global water and sanitation crisis, and to inspire people the world over to take action. You may be wondering, “what crisis? I have all the water I need.” I’m talking about the fact that an estimated 663 million people still lack access to an improved drinking water source, and almost 2.4 billion lack a basic toilet. What's more, every day almost 1,400 children around the world die from something as simple as diarrhea, which is mainly caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation and hygiene. It’s pretty crazy to think that in 2016, not everyone has access to something as basic as clean water and a safe, respectable and clean place to go when nature calls. The sad reality is that billions of people are living in deprived conditions, and it’s up to us to make sure it doesn’t continue.

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Water & Sanitation

Access to Safe Drinking Water: Challenges and Opportunities

www.fairobserver.com
Water & Sanitation

In developing countries, women and girls spend an estimated 40 billion hours a year collecting water. Since humans established permanent settlements and systems of agriculture, efforts to develop water supplies and waste management for the successful maintenance and growth of societies have been apparent. Archaeologists have found evidence of ancient wells, water pipes and both public and private bathing and toilet facilities in the Bronze Age. In ancient Greece and Rome, the importance of water for public health was recognized, and inequalities of access according to wealth and status must have been present.

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General

Is Japan ready for social innovation?

www.japantoday.com
General

In recent years, “social entrepreneurship,” “social innovation” and “sustainability” have found their way into the mainstream lexicon of Japanese business circles. Picking up the trend, the Japanese Forum of Business and Society (JFBS) held its 5th annual conference last September at Waseda University under the theme “Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Innovation.”

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Water & Sanitation

Developing countries look to private investors to solve water crisis

www.newvision.co.ug
Water & Sanitation

When Rudy Roberts realised the potential of investing in the water sector three years ago, he patterned with the Danish pump manufacturer Grundfos to launch the Mega Water Corporation in South Africa. This industrial water company, which Rudy heads as Chief Executive is now credited for revolutionising water supply in South Africa and across the African continent. Since its inception, the Guatang province-based corporation has implemented various projects in the South Africa’s water sector that range from enabling access to groundwater to rehabilitating hospital water supply among others.

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Education

A College Education for Prisoners

www.nytimes.com
Education

States are finally backing away from the draconian sentencing policies that swept the country at the end of the last century, driving up prison costs and sending too many people to jail for too long, often for nonviolent offenses. Many are now trying to turn around the prison juggernaut by steering drug addicts into treatment instead of jail and retooling parole systems that once sent people back to prison for technical violations.

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Health

We are menaced by ever more diseases. But Zika, like most, hits the poor hardest

www.theguardian.com
Health

The disease takes its name from a remote forest in Uganda where the disease was first identified in 1947. However, following WHO director general Margaret Chan’s announcement of an international public health emergency on February 1 prompted by the spread of the virus to Central and South America and the worrying numbers of Brazilian babies born with microcephaly in the past year, it looks as if Zika will forever be associated with Brazil.

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Environment

Energy Landscapes: An Aerial View Of Europe's Carbon Footprint

e360.yale.edu
Environment

Europe and the United States have very similar standards of living, but significantly different carbon footprints — with Europe’s per capita carbon emissions less than 50 percent of those in the U.S. Aerial photographer Alex MacLean decided to document this phenomenon in an attempt to understand how the highly developed nations of northern Europe are able to spew significantly less carbon into the atmosphere. Flying over Sweden, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and Wales with camera in hand, MacLean came away with an appreciation for how a country’s carbon footprint is directly related to how efficiently it designs, moves through, and powers its built environment.

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General

Things to consider before taking an education loan

indianexpress.com
General

About 6 million rupees. That’s how much I paid to get admission into the prestigious London Business School for my Masters in Business Administration. And that’s just the admission and tuition fee. Add accommodation, travel, and living expenses, and my entire cost of education for two years came to a grand total of 1 crore rupees. That’s equivalent of doing an MBA from the top-IIMs thrice!

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Education

There's an urgent need for reforms in our education system: Here's why

indianexpress.com
Education

In the midst of gloom over the upcoming global recession, India is described as a rare bright spot, the ‘last BRIC standing’ as Brazil, China and Russia slip into recession. For India, economists are still predicting growth over 7 per cent in 2016, thanks to low oil prices and reliance on domestic markets. There are reasons however, that I would be more cautious about, particularly about our optimism over India’s long-term growth. And one area that especially concerns me is the state of our education.

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Class on waste recycling fetches environment expert Guinness entry

Feb. 8, 2016, 12:39 p.m.

Congratulations to Mr. Manion and looking forward to more events that mobilize the public towards being environmentally conscious.

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Transitioning to the social sector? Here are a few pointers.

Oct. 27, 2015, 2:09 p.m.

If I may add my own advice, I'd say do a lot of volunteer work. Field work acquaints you with activities you may end up taking up full time. The only way to find out is to get out and be part of a project.

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Alternative Schooling in India - A Graduate's Perspective

Oct. 27, 2015, 6:40 a.m.

I really do believe some of alt-schools' principles can be adopted easily into the mainstream system. I mean, research has proven that power structures in the teacher-student relationship have zero positive effect on the quality of education provided, yet an environment of fear and authority is encouraged in most government schools, under the guise of "maintaining decorum". Alt-schools are nothing but mainstream schools with tweaks. We need to find the tweaks that are working well and adopt them into the larger system.

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Big Picture: What's a day in a classroom for India's 73,54,151 teachers?

Sept. 9, 2015, 7:33 a.m.

Amazing piece! Each location had such violently different circumstances, yet one common thread remains - families and children finally understand the need for education. Students are demanding better educators, families are demanding better administration. If there's a positive takeaway from it, this is it.

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Commercialisation biggest drawback for education system: CM Kejriwal

Sept. 8, 2015, 12:02 p.m.

Tooley's work needs to be looked at with a pinch of salt. His research has been extensively critiqued and many of his conclusions invalidated. Affordable private schools are undoubtedly an important part of the education ecosystem today and they shouldn't be ignored. But their role in providing 'high quality' education must be scrutinised more carefully; it is too much of a leap to say that they are a reliable alternative to public education - however badly government schools may be doing. In any case, Kejriwal is clearly talking about the big private schools which cater to middle and upper classes.

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A common schooling system would bring us together as a society

Sept. 4, 2015, 9:03 a.m.

Completely agree. Equity cannot be forced from the top. But it may be built up, bit by bit, from the ground. A strong public education system is essential for any society aspiring to be more equitable. And this is a problem that needs to be tackled head-on, not like this.

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Students Start School Year With New Apple Technology

Aug. 26, 2015, 6:57 a.m.

@Naina, good point. Though the generation in question is likely to be brought up on Apple products anyway.

post

5 Big Ideas That Don't Work In Education

Aug. 18, 2015, 7:01 a.m.

In the Indian context: a. Achievement standards: These don't really exist for us, but the equivalent would be the board exams. Schools need to stop using marks and pass percentages in board exams as the ultimate standard for student performance, and focus on growth. b. Achievement tests: same as above. Instead of boards, it might be better to have optional tests which may be used for applying to colleges. c. School choice: Not applicable to the majority of children still studying in government schools, since they can't afford anything else. But even those who can - do not necessarily perform better. So this lesson rings true for India. Things like teacher choice are far, far away. Let's first focus on getting enough qualified teachers IN the classrooms. d. Class size: Other countries are debating between 33 and 18, haha. Some of our schools are at 150. So, yes. We do need an unconditional reduction. e. More money: This is also important. We need to stop harping about using 6% of GDP on education. A lot of the present allocation is wasted in leakages. These need to be plugged. Also, money given to the states should be tied to their performance on different educational indicators.

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Low-fee private schooling: what do we really know?

Aug. 14, 2015, 9:07 a.m.

The most important point Prachi Srivastava makes, at least with respect to India, is that research on quality of education in low-fee private schools is inconclusive. This needs to be taken into account by all those who indiscriminately advocate for privatisation of education and for minimising the role of the state. When students in these private schools perform better than their peers in public schools, it could largely be because of self-selection. We also need to consider the fact that many of these schools pay their teachers a pittance, enabling them to maintain such 'affordable' rates. The trouble in India is that government schools are so bad, that any alternative is a good alternative. But on a systemic level, low-fee private schools cannot be the answer. We have to strengthen the public education system.

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Delhi and the primary education mess.

Aug. 14, 2015, 8:53 a.m.

Delhi faces an issue of multiple, sometimes overlapping authorities with little coordination between. Overall, it's a good thing that the government has chosen to spend more money on education. They should definitely allocate part of it to the MCD. It is MCD students who eventually go to the senior secondary schools run by the state government. For sustainable change, you need to start at the primary level. There would be large gains from a collaboration between these two bodies in overhauling the schooling system.

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What Do the Poor Need? Try Asking Them

Aug. 9, 2015, 8:02 a.m.

This cannot be news. Surely, the idea that development should start from the bottom-up and be participatory has been around for a while now. It's good that programs using this approach can show measurable success. That's the kind of evidence needed to convince policymakers.

What the hell is a skill?

July 21, 2015, 4:38 p.m.

http://thewire.in/2015/07/15/fake-degrees-is-not-the-problem-obsession-with-degrees-is-6510/ Here's an article to add perspective on the issue. It talks about how degrees in a small centralised pool of colleges are increasingly being valued more than technical education, which can actually ensure employment.